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20121201
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. >> might challenge was that it was a very small police force for a very large city. we were able to implement change and that the crime rate has gone for 12 consecutive years. >> reporter: he also says that the public's opinion about the police force and willing to turn that around that around in oakland as well. j.r. stone kron 4 news. >> oakland is 400,000 it has seen the 130 murders. the most in five years. oakland has about 400-thousand residents. it's seen 130 murders.most in five years. one of every three-thousand people were killed in san francisco's populationit has seen 67 murders.that's up 34 percentso one in every 12-thousand people were murdered this year in san franisco. and san jose has nearly 1 million people. 45 murders this year, most since 1991. one in every 21,000 people were killed in san jose. all three bay area cities saw homicides increase this year compared to 2011. for comparison.we'll widen the view. chicaco has 2.7 million people.and 499 murders this year.that's one in every 54- hundred people being murdered.,,just a little better than oakland. and new
in this country. we've done it in new york. this is the safest big city in the country. there are other large cities that are making real inroads against gun violence, but at the local level mayors and governors can't do it without leadership at the federal level, and, again, the passion and the comforting words from the president, they're important, but they're not nearly as important as the kind of leadership that he and congressman larson, his colleagues in congress, need to demonstrate now to get something done. >> congressman, before we go, i have to ask you, what factor do you think contributes the most to moving the ball forward on this? is it greater coverage in the media? is it more leadership from our politicians? what do you need to see to push for gun control reform in congress? >> well, clearly, clearly, it's all of the above, but most importantly, it's leadership from our elected officials. we are elected with a responsibility and a charge, and we have an obligation to speak out. if this were a terrorist attack and, frankly, i think these are domestic acts of terrorism. we would
for being had largely disappeared. if you think about every one of america's older, colder cities, they were all part of solving a transportation problem. they were all nodes on a transportation network. if you go back to 1816, we as americans sat on the edge of an enormously wealthy continent that was virtually inaccessible. in 1816 it cost as much to move goods 30 miles over land as it did to ship them across the entire atlantic ocean. it was so expensive to get goods in. over the course of the 19th century, we've built an amazing network. we built canals like the erie and illinois and michigan canals, railroads atticaals, and cities grew up. at buffalo, the western terminus of the erie canal. the oldest cities were typically where the river meets the sea, like boston and new york, but every one of america's 20 largest cities was on a major waterway. chicago was a future that was made it the linchpin of a watery arc that went from new york to new orleans. and industries grew up around these transportation hubs. chicago's most famous is, of course, its stockyards, and that's what you're loo
, everyone. >> reporter: in september, new york became the first u.s. city to restrict sales of large-sized sodas and other sugary drinks. restaurants, fast food chains and movie theaters will only be allowed to serve cups that old 470 milliliters or less. that's a third of the largest cups now available. the deciding factor was the city's ballooning medical costs. in new york city alone obesity-related medical costs come to over $3.8 billion a year. if obesity rates continue to rise, the financial burden will be crippling. >> this is the single biggest step any city has ever taken to curb obesity. it is not the last step that lot of cities are going to take. we believe that it will help save lives. >> reporter: the beverage industry is fiercely opposed to the ban. workers have been holding protest outside new york city hall. >> they should really take a stand and make sure they're getting exercise and not just trying to cut the size of the drink. >> reporter: they have launched an all-out war against the city claiming the ban is invalid. many movie theaters the are also voicing their
you, judge. >> new studies shows stall construction projects are on the rise in america's large of the city. according to a new report from builders there are hundreds of vacant lots and half finished projects around new york city despite all of them having the necessary permits for construction. now the news from brooklyn. that is this about? >>guest: well, there are e monuments in a bad economy. a finish which is one of several hundrednd at the city like that where the construction just stops. the workers are one day and suddenly they never show up again and they are e and quiet for years. this is a legacy of the 2008 financial crisis having to do with long-term institutional borrowing and lending and that is a problem. look at the numbers: 691 inactive sites up 17 percent in new york city since february. 45 percent dormant since 1999. it is run out of money or a combination of running out or fought having enough sales or the market for rentals does not appear to be strong enough to justify completion. >>guest: the american institute of architects are putting together develope
a largely black city, you saw folks going out to the suburbs. dollars going with them. that's the struggle. >> it's a struggle, but is the message at the end of your film hopeful or depressing? >> well, it's realistic. we're not saying that detroit is over, it can't rise again. we're saying please double down on detroit. please focus on a lot of us our cities going bankrupt and infrastructural problems in detroit. it's not a message of it's all going to be fine but if people ban together and we focus on places like detroit, of course, there's hope. >> you talk to so many people that are struggling. what did they say they want to get done and how do they expect it to get done? >> they want basic -- i think they want a basic quality of life. they really do. at this point it's donning on them that it's never going to be the way it used to be but they want to have a basic life and that their kids will have at least as good a life as they have. >> what we're seeing in greece is what's happening in detroit. austerity cuts. >> we're seeing a big bailout -- >> right. >> starting with the auto indu
have adopted the regulations, namely -- and i went there and heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk at what he had learned as a mayor. he'd been a central government official before he was posted down and he realized once he got there, the central government officials don't really understand the lives of ordinary people. and then he began to watch the proceedings, the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation, and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice that was one of the first times in 35, 40 years of going to china at her to chinese talk about procedural justice. i think that the term is in the vocabulary, and i think that local experimentation may at least help in the incremental building of a changed legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of the american federal system, is called the brandeis, called the laboratories of experiment. now, one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion is it a very big population. it's hard to govern. at one virtue of is you can divide into parts and provinces, and you rea
an amazing home and we may stay right here in new york city. i'm on it. >> hi, i'm sheila. my husband terry and i are looking for a large apartment. we recently sold our apartment on the west side. we have a 3-year-old daughter, and we definitely need more space. >> sheila! >> brian! >> come on. you're here. >> this is hamilton heights. this area is hot, hot, hot. i love it. come on. >> let's do it. >> let's do it. ♪ >> sheila. welcome. >> oh, wow. this is beautiful. >> you love prewar. >> yes. >> and you gave me $1,600 jourks 000 to work with. four bedrooms, amazing views. are you ready for this? >> i'm ready. >> all right. take a look. >> just feel the history. >> yeah, so open and bright. >> now, sheila, in your current home, i know you have your dining right in your living room. but come on. >> oh, wow. >> this is a whole another level. >> absolutely. >> so sheila, when you gave me your price, how many bedrooms did you think you would get? >> two. >> two? you're getting four here. this -- >> oh, it's beautiful. it's a little smaller than my current bedroom, but it's definitely a nice
city and steam boat springs -- a distance of 7 miles. over the first of a long line of nine beautiful columns, nevada cans had constructed a large house to bathe in. twain likened the jets of hot, white steam amid from fissures in the earth to a steam boat's escape pipes. they made a boiling, surging noise exactly as a steamboat did. he enjoyed placing eggs in his handkerchief and dipping them in the springs where they would soft boil in two minutes or or hard boil in four depending upon his mood. sawyer luxury rated in the hot mist and surveyed his cards which were murky in the haze. the pace boards were damp from the sweat running down his arms, but the fresh bottles of dark beer stall had sent in were cold. in his 32 years, sawyer had been a torch boy in the new york fire engine company number 14 and in san francisco had run and battled fire for broderick 1 under chief david broderick, the city's first volunteer fire company and first fire chief. sawyer served with other engine houses and toiled as a steamboat engineer mying the mexicans -- plying the mexicans -- [inaudible] trade.
of more than 3 million businesses. small shops to large corporations. the 100-year-old chamber has offices and staff in every major city girdling the globe. now, regarding the fiscal cliff gridlock, what is the judgment of the chamber? answer. don't do anything now. punt. instead of lawmakers racing in the 14 days left of their lame duck session with christmas day in the middle of it, to implement spending cuts and tax hikes, the chamber says congress and the president should simply and temporarily extend the bush tax cuts across the board. punting will leave current tax policy and fiscal outlays unchanged. thereby wreaking no havoc on the economy and no gun at your head settlement. the newly elected congress comes in january, so any detante will have more legitimacy if it originates at the time of a new incoming congress rather than a lame duck departing one. question, what's the rational thing for our lawmakers to do? mort zuckerman. >> the rational thing, the grown-up thing, which, of course is entirely irrelevant in this process is to find way to get our deficits under control, the deb
, but the landscape is there now tells you that there was a creek they are. in other words, wherever there is a large sheet of land formerly in the city you'll find public or utilities, things considered at some point of lesser value. likewise since the creek on his story over at once was public housing, industrial warehouses, places where there's a ton of repair shops for taxicabs. the signs are written in numerous languages and also where people -- immigrants are storing their food carts. so it's a place -- that in itself, whereas the creek this practice wars come where things are constantly changing. new plants coming in constantly to nourish that saltmarsh gives us in the estuary. that is mimicked by the human settlement. so it still is a creek. i want to collect estuary i.t. of human development. there's this idea -- of course the city looks at these areas typically, especially in the last 10 years or so that this is an area that is not being used to its full potential. actually this is as if they were -- we were talking about college, but are trained creek is driving in the recently settled her
be the large of the tax hike since world war ii. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton remains in a new york city hospital this morning after doctors discovered a blood clot stemming from a concussion she had earlier this month. now, a spokesperson for clinton says she is being treated with medication and will most likely stay in the hospital for the next 48 hours. the clot was discovered yesterday during a follow-up appointment. >>> same-sex couples in maryland will be able to marry tomorrow on new year's day. state lawyers said because january 1st is a holiday and because there is a two-day wait period for licenses to take effect, they could not marry until january 4th. the state's attorney general now says all of the licenses will take effect tomorrow. >>> 2012 was another tough year for the economy. >> so it is no surprise that lottery sales were up. fox's claudia cowan has a look for us. >> are you going to walk away with it? let's find out u. >> reporter: even when times are tough, lotteries rake in the dough. >> during bad times, people want to have hope and dreams and they are appare
waters eight miles northwest of the kiker green between virginia city and steamboat springs a distance miles. for the first of a long line of thing before columns they distracted a large custody then. same like and a hot wasting the mid from fishers in the earth tree steamboat this gave. they needed boiling, surging noise exactly is the steamboat to. he enjoyed facing exit his handkerchief and to demand the springs. they would in two minutes or hard oil and for depending upon his mood. sawyer luxuriated in hotmail and surveyed his cards, which were murky and the haze. the spores were damp from the sweat running down his arms. the fresh bottles of dirt simon were cold. in his 32 years, sawyer had been a torch boy. in engine company have run embattled fire for broader quad under david broderick from the city's volunteer fire come any in first fire chief. so your circuits other engine house is an toiled as the steamboat engineer, flying the mexican feature a. twain, who held strong opinions on stever's perked up when sawyer mentioned he had worked as a steam vote engineer. the journalist
but again sandy hook elementary school, 60 miles from new york city. small community. rather large elementary school of nearly 700 students, kin guard 10 to 4th grade. a shooting at this elementary school. breaking details as we come into the newsroom. jon? jon: now that u.n. ambassador susan rice officially has taken herself out of the running to become secretary of state there is new speculation who president obama's nomination will go to. right now massachusetts senator john kerry considered to be at the top of the list. let's talk about it with paul gigot, editorial page editor of "the wall street journal." ironic, because if it had been susan rice, john kerry's committee would have to confirm her in the senate. >> that's right. jon: now that problem is done away with. >> well, that's right. and it would have been a big fight. jon: not a problem i should say. the circumstance. >> it would have been a big political fight. in that sense susan rice did the president a favor by removing herself from the, from the discussions so that they won't have to have this fight and the presid
that there have been a lot of bullying going on and targeting of bullying here in new york city. one of the very early don't shoot that we did was around raising awareness. largely, it was a lot of the racism in the attacks that we were seeing in the wake of 9/11. and that the kids were being targeted, that it was a real affection of what was going on in our culture, that these people no longer felt safe. so it's a big picture. >> host: what i am hearing you say is that this is about creating a school climate that is safe for all kids. but all of the kids and adults in the school, at whatever level they are working are part of the solution. and that you can't just dismiss this as kids will be kids. or that, you know, tough it out. this is really about fundamental dignity. it is about, unfortunately, life and death. and i think that there are far too many young people losing their lives to bullying. due to suicide, suicide has been a wake-up call to all of us. your book and movie have a lot of resources in them. would you like to tell us about your resources that are available on your website? im
to get to ocean much faster. narrator: cities throughout southern california converted natural rivers to these concrete channels, part of their storm drain systems. this allowed expanding development without the need for large flood plains. kharaghani: the los angeles river is approximately 51 miles. concrete reduces the size of the river that you need to carry the water because it speeds up the flow of water. if you'd like to remove all the concrete and to have natural system to carry the water to protect you from flooding, you need to have almost one mile on each side of the river set aside for transport of rain. so in order for the city to have use of those lands around the river, concrete made it possible to have minimum land so the water can be carried to the ocean in the fastest possible way. but, unfortunately, because of population growth and poor housekeeping, people are putting a lot of pollutants on the street and the streets are the openings to our stormwater sewer system. in an average year, 4,000 to 5,000 tons of trash ends up in long beach. man: we've created a system t
economy is putting more large trucks on the road or maybe because of all the bike lanes in new york city and people are angry and trying to hit them. can't confirm that. >>> triple a reports the average annual price of gas this year will almost certainly top last year's record. well, despite that, prices are falling now and in a big way. the lund berg survey shows the average cost of a gallon of regular unleaded is down 10 cents over the past three weeks and i continuing down. what's causing this, rich? >> reporter: americans are driving less. that and slowing economic growth mean the world is using less oil. after problems earlier this year, refineries are pumping out more gas. also, warmer than average temperatures meaning americans are using less oil to heat their homes. all that pushes prices down further. prices also spiked after hurricane sandy and have fallen since, shepard. >> shepard: so right now they're headed down more, right? > >> reporter: that's right. there's a difference between lowest and highest of 80 cents a gallon. 3.85 in long island, in mems me, tennessee, it's les
. good to see you. we are here with the waterford crystal ball. very large. 12 feet in diameter. had no idea it was this large until i was right here on top of the building. it is a chilly start to the day here in new york city. looking at temperatures in the 30s. it feels much colder when you factor in the breeze. oned chills should be in the 20s. you have found el up. i have seen people rive about noon. 12-hours waiting out here until midnight. it will be much worse across places like the midwest with temperatures only in the single digits today. it will feel colder as well. in florida a nice day temperatures in the 70s. very typical. we have a new storm that we are going to be tracking. we are seeing areas of rain across portions of texas and tennessee on the northern side of the storm system you will be seeing areas of snow. keep that in mind tonight. >>> thank you. >>> now your starting lineup the top sports stories rg 3 is playoff wound. the rookie quarterback leading the redskins to the nfc east title in 1999. won in a winner take all game for the division. washington on a 7 g
awareness and a lot of targeting of kids here in new york city. one of the very early film shoots we did was around a day where they were raising awareness about the bullying they were experiencing, and largely it was a lot of the racism and the attacks that we were seeing in the wake of 9/11 and the muslim kids were being targeted. the sikh kids and the muslim kids were being targeted and that was a real reflection of what was going on nationally in our culture and in our consciousness and communities where people know longer felt safe. so it is a big picture and i think that is why it's a tough nut to crack. >> host: it sure is. what i'm hearing you say is that this is about creating a school climate that is safe for all kids, that all the kids and the adults in the school, at whatever level they are working, report of the solution and you can't just dismiss this as kids will be kids you know, or toughen up. this is really about fundamental dignity and it's about unfortunately, it's about life and death with some kids. i think the ways -- far too many young people are losing their live
kids by and large are clueless about this. it is not just language thing. these kids know more about the middle east and china. in speaking to the average high- school in new york city and after it's about what is happening in the world, i think it would take your breath away. this is a serious problem. the second part of what the technology can matter is because we did not have to limit the school day anymore to the hours inside the school room. as -- there is much more we can do. i watch people here from a great school in sweden. and they have managed to create a portal in ways. i met a kid whose mother was an aris -- was a nurse. we are the only profession that admits we are failing in what we're doing for our kids and we all go home at 3:00. there has to be a way to think differently about the dimensions of the challenge. i think technology is part of that problem. about to go back to what condie started. as important as music and art and global history is, to two cannot read into basic mathematics -- kids who cannot read or do basic mathematics will not do higher or critical thi
laws here in new york city? do you think that this has curtailed violence in this city? >> well, i think that it has curtailed violence as much as possible. the problem that we have, of course is criminals go to virginia and other places, mostly virginia, buy large quantities of weapons and ship them illegally into new york so they get around the new york laws. which is why i introduced legislation a number of years ago to limit the number of weapons that a licensed gun dealer could sell to a person, to one a month, i think i said. but -- because no legitimate sportsman needs more than one every -- how many rifles can you have to shoot deer? >> well, today the white house website was flooded with new petitions. but before we get into the x's and o's and crossing the t's and dotting the i's of any kind of legislation, it really needs to be recognized as, for lack of a better term, a game changer, a moment in history where this changes public opinion. do you think we're there? >> i think we will be there if the president exploits it. and otherwise it will go to the next one. >> and d
the north bay and oakland, hayward, redwood city, the san mateo coast and by 10:00, the eastern and southern portions of the bay. by midnight, it will be largely self of the golden gate. it will be diving down to the south with reveron showers and 54 clock. by the time we head out tomorrow is going to be dry. we will also see the clouds decreasing. here is what we can accep expect-rainfall totals will be less than one-half inch but nearly 1 in. near the coast. local snow levels are going to fall but when that happens there is the possibility of a light dusting in the north bay hills. as for the sierras, some snowfall and early tomorrow. lingering flurries and mostly sunny conditions by monday. they look at your extended forecast. dry saturday and also drier on sunday with the chances of showers in the north bay. dry on tuesday with another chance for the entire-bay area on wednesday. >> catherine: the bay area's favorite way to ring in the new year. is always with kron 4. parties - and of course fireworks. i'll be hosting along with gary radnich. kron 4's new year's live. starts at 11-30 on
. she is still at large. deadly subway pushing in less than a month in new york city. there is no deal yet for the fiscal cliff. but for now we have at least avoided the container cliff. 15,000 dock workers at 15 major u.s. ports and port owners agreeing to extend an expired contract for 30 days. the main issue is container royalties. the heavier the container the more dock workers get paid. owners want to cap payments. a strike would have meant higher prices on many goods like clothing, auto goods and electronic products because they would have been in short supply. emma lou harris could be in trouble with the law. tmz reports that harris is accused of hitting another car on a highway then driving off. the l.a. county d.a. is deciding whether harris will face any charges. in one was hurt. a rep for the singer says it was so minor harris didn't even know she hit the other car. and those are your headlines. >> thank you, juliet. let's talk about this story because this is outrageous. >> dave: unbelievable. >> juliet: sick. >> clayton: here is what vladimir putin did in response to the u
-presidential protesters in tahrir square. in other parts of the city, about two miles from here, as many as 200,000 protesters turned out. these are people who support president morsi. many of them from the muslim brotherhood. a large number were bussed in from rural areas in egypt. many carrying the koran and shouting, god is the law. it was a real show of force and show of public support by those who support egypt's new president. he also announced there will be a constitutional referendum on december 15. it came really after a vote on friday pushing through that constitution in one day. now the nation will have the chance to vote up or down on that constitution. president morsi said the extreme powers he declared for himself last week would end when that constitution is ratified. perhaps in just two weeks' time. it's not clear that's going to be enough for the protesters behind me, some of whom intend to sleep on the square until they drive president morsi from power. rick, back to you. >> rick: steve streaming live from cairo. thanks. >> arthel: closer to home, our neighbor to the south swe
. >> eliot: as well we should. editor at large of the atlantic, steve clemons president of ploughshares fund, joe cirincione. seemingly they're right back where they started. what speakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakakak nobody knows disasters like comedians. >> new york, the high-tech resilient city. just don't get us wet. what the hell was that? >> that's from my upcoming benefit for victims of hurricane sandy. i booked the strongest, smartest comics i could find. my comedian friends and i will raise money to rebuild homes and lives one laugh at a time. >> awe damn, the lights are out! you know what? i'll watch a little television until they come back on. >> only on current tv. >> eliot: on the 18 -- only 18 days remain until we go over the so-called fiscal cliff and with congress once again heading home after another grueling two-day work week, president obama met once again with speaker boehner. while the president keeps talking about revenues, speaker boehner focuses on expenditures and it is hard to tell if any progress is being made.
the battle that is on. they are better equipped, they have taken large parts of the northern part of the country, and they are also beginning to tighten around a lot of the central syrian cities, including damascus and trying to go all the way in videotapes, they said that they were going to go to bashar al-assad's house. the russians are changing their tune a little bit. the russians only foreign enable poor. one of the reasons they have been so locked up with they are thinking they want to keep their port. the russians are not the only one involved. lots of people sending weapons into syria. you have a war going on with the wrong, on the other side, you have weapons coming from saudi arabia and qatar in turkey and that is what is supplying the rebels in the civil war that is continuing to rage on. both of those don't really have a lot to gain. they have a lot to lose. their side loses, they will lose a lot. as long as the syrians are willing to keep killing each other in this process, so far the syrian civil war has now claimed 44,000 lives. many people believe there really no m
&a." >> the white house was very controversial, as most planes in america were. the designer of washington city held a competition where he submitted a design from the palace. it was not particularly odd inspiring. in 1821 the european diplomats held a congress that was neither large nor all an inspiring, but the answer that the congressman gave said that the building served as a purpose. that if it were larger and more elegant, some president might be inclined to become its permanent resident. >> the former new york times kota critic has gathered some of her favorite white house photos in "the white house: the president's home and history." watch tonight on american history tv, c-span 3. >> monday, the ohio and west region yes secretary of state talked about the implementation of the voter id laws at the center for public policy. this is one hour. >> there are two sessions this afternoon. we have an end at 5:00 at the latest, so i want to get together as quickly as possible. this panel, we brought them together to talk about the issue of integrity. i do not think that we could do better than the pa
as a replacement. >>> they ignored warnings that a large hurricane could hit the big apple. a 2,006 report said it was a question of time before hurricane came and flooded the system and caused wide outages in new york city. those warnings went unheeded due to concerns about budget cuts and the likelihood of such a storm. hurricane sandy is the second costliest disaster in u.s. history. >>> they had the first hack-a-thon. they worked on ideas yesterday afternoon. the goal was to create fun and practical apps using public information available through county records. >> we have seen interesting ideas around restaurant inspections. and we have seen ideas around places like parks. parks and rec information was interesting to people. >>> the grand prize winners made an app called book it and they took home a $3,000 prize. >>> there appears to and growing backlash against the new logo for the university of california system. more than 25,000 people have signed an on line petition at change.org to review the new design which made its debut friday. some say it is undignified. the new design is not rep
governments both large and small, the state of new york city dwovet -- government and so many others that are waiting to see if they will get some relief sew they can move tor ward with their plans. we beat back host of the crippling amendments. we beat back all of the crippling amendments an most of the amendments -- and most of the amendments. it's a very, very trying day, i think, for the senate. the century old tradition of different parts of the country rallying to help those that are beleaguered because of the difficult natural disasters continuing and the fact that 12 republicans voted for a bill that contain virtually no offsets except for the one amendment that passed last week. that is a full bill, a whole bill, a bill that gets new york and new jersey rapidly on the road to recovery fills us with hope that we can get something done and get something done quickly. when we press, when we explain to our colleagues what we needed and the desperation in here, they listened carefully. and we're really very, very glad about that. let me say a few specific things. there is very am
15 for your high over in rapid city and 32 over in minneapolis and 22 degrees in the city of denver and feeling very cold out here. as i mentioned we have snowfall and a large area of rainfall to the east of us and further off towards the ohio valley, tennessee valley and lower mississippi valley and further south we actually have a risk to see severe storms and damaging winds are possible and isolated tornado cannot be ruled out. and temperatures are cold enough for snow, seeing that minneapolis, north and south dakota and blizzard warnings for some of the areas and we're talking wind gusts over 40 miles per hour possible so white out conditions, dangerous travel conditions across the the region and keep it in mind throughout the rest of today and blizzard warnings in effect. >> and ali's 40 miles per hour wind. >> alisyn: a pleasant thought. what's happening in 23 days from now, that of course is the fiscal cliff. it was disheartening to hear john boehner come out yesterday and say we are nowhere near any sort of progress or any sort of outcome. >> we have been talking. >> clayton
of hartford. 60 miles outside of new york city. a decent sized town, population about 27,000. but the school district itself has about 5400 kids. it's a pretty large district. this school in particular, kindergarten through fourth grade as the wnyw helicopter moves closer to that town. alisyn: it's sandy hook elementary school. about that town it's a very, very pretty town. it has a lot of beautiful town squares, churches on corners with pretty old steeples. parts of it are historic. it shows that this sort of terror parents experience everywhere, sadly. this story happens everywhere and you can just imagine how parents are feeling as they are getting this news that something apparently has happened at this school today, and there were gunshots, and that someone is hurt, but beyond that it is hard to know if all the students are okay. we wish we could report that, but at this hour we don't have that information. bill: crime is very few to this town, very low. one violent criminal offense in 2010 is are being reported in newtown, connecticut. okay, we're working through this. we'll be on the
at the school bus for her beloved owner, norah. and their proud momma gets the lotto of love living large in connecticut. >> in all, we found homes for more than 50 dogs and cats in 2012. a few of the families with us now along with richard from animal control in new york city. good morning, everyone. richard, this has to make you feel great, seeing this lineup, a perfect year. >> i love this segment and everything we do and all these wonderful people that adopted from us, it is very very touching. >> absolutely. let's meet some of the dogs. tell me about buddy. you got him two days before super storm sandy? >> yes. we took him home and he was on the street. he couldn't go on the street sunday. the first time he went on the street was in the sand, almost two feet of sand that came on our street. >> what has he meant to you as you look to recover? i know your home was washed out. >> we went to brooklyn and is fabulous. he is extremely loving and gets along very well with my other dog. they trail along together all over the place. >> he's beautiful. i want to meet petey over here, the three
because states and cities are obligated to pay all those benefits, or make another deal with their employees, which can often be quite bruising. at the federal level, a large stability thinking this too will change as we get into some of the government spending we've been talking about. but so far, the federal government has stayed pretty steady. host: one person saying i was hired one year ago, took 14 months of nonstop applications that generated few interviews, now thriving at work. he's age 63. guest: that's a terrific story and is great to hear. this is one person out of the 146,000 in any given month, i guess you might say. that is nice counterpoint to people who just want to collect unemployment until it runs out. and jobs are materializing. there's too few of them, no doubt about it, but they're there. business leaders will sort of breathe a sigh of relief and in 201 start to hire more. host: and show the viewers at home, a story in the financial times, they can read it for themselves, the construction ability, specifically home builders. lack of workers stops bu
over 40 schools in new york city that are destroyed, mostly by the water. roads, bridges, you name it. the devastation is everywhere, it is wide, it is deep. and so with this kind of devastation, even a large area like new york cannot handle it on its own. and fortunately, mr. president, we've had a wisdom here in this government for close to a century, and that is when nature strikes, when the hand of god comes down on earth and creates the kind of damage that man can't comprehend, that no locality can handle it on its own, and so the federal government steps in. which means the country as a whole steps in. and when there were hurricanes in louisiana and mississippi, the whole country stepped in. we said we know this is too much for to you handle alone. when there were forest fires out west, the whole country stepped in saying we know you can't handle this kind of devastation on your own. when there was flooding in the missouri and mississippi valleys, the same. the federal government came in. and we in new york, hundreds of millions, probably over the decades, billions of our tax do
time. stay alert. if you have any tornado watches or warnings for your city, seek shelter immediately because that risk is very real especially in this area shaded in red and outer banks of north carolina and isolated tornados, damaging wind gusts and large hail from some of the thunderstorms. blizzard warnsing are in effect. not just heavy snowfall, up to six inches across parts of the midwest. you factor in wind gusts over 40 miles per hour. in parts of indiana, illinois, and ohio. we have winter storm warnings in portions of pennsylvania, upstate new york and portions of new england. jamie, for parts of new york city looks like we'll get a coating throughout the evening rush. the heavy snowfall will stay further to the west. jamie: maria molina will be pretty busy today. thank you, maria. of course these tornados i was mentioning are pretty rare occurrence in winter. but they do happen and can often be deadly. in fact over last three years 21 people have been killed by tornados this time of year. average of 34 tornados spring up in the month of december. the last time a tornado str
washington city, there was competition. americans were not having a palace. it was not particularly awe inspiring. in fact, a diplomat told the congress it was neither large nor awe inspiring but the answer that the congressman gave was the building served it purpose. if it was larger praps more president would be declined to become its permen innocent resident. -- permanent dez represent. >> the president's home and photographs and history. watch sunday evening on c-span 3's american history tv. >> the mayor of new jersey went before congress today along with the new york's small business director and the long island small business president. this is about an hour and a half. >> we want to discussion the small business administration response to hurricane sandy. the president's recent supplemental request in this space and state and local small business recovers in the impacted region. i would like to thank our witnesses that will be testifying in just a moment and i will introduce them in just a moment. but let me make a couple of brief opening statements. we're here today to evaluate
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